how do i stop grass and weed growth?


how do i stop grass and weed growth?
i have a corner area of my yard that is somewhat unlevel (by inches) and want to lay a teak “deck” of sorts (that will be only about an inch or so high ) to make that area pretty and inviting. i thought to put sand down first so the wood will be level but how do i keep the grass and weeds from growing under and up through the “decking”? newspapers on the ground, then sand? tks (this is meant to be a very inexpensive little project)

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560 thoughts on “how do i stop grass and weed growth?

  1. Hon, be sure to apply Roundup (or other total vegetation killer) on whatever’s growing there now, before you lay down the sand. Make sure the grass and/or weeds there are actively growing first, though.
    Laying ground cloth will help keep vegetation at bay. You can purchase various grades; some of it’s very inexpensive. You’ll just put it in place (overlapping a bit) and use staples to keep it there.
    If any growth should come through your new deck, you can reapply the Roundup and that will take care of it. But ground cloth is quite effective, and will stop any remaining weed seeds that may have been there from germinating.
    I have three decks at home that we’ve done this way Hon—never had a problem. Good luck!

  2. so i want to plant some pumpkins however i began to and was told to stop because it would interfere with the growth of my new tree i planted near it. is this true? will the pumpkins take nutrients away from the tree? also can the roots of the pumpkins interfere with a pipe nearby? I know nothing of pumpkins, so some help would be greatly appreciated. One last question, how do you prepare the soil beforehand? do you need to clear the area of grass and weeds, or can you just dig a hole and plant the seed? Thank you!

  3. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  4. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  5. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  6. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  7. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  8. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  9. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  10. i have a corner area of my yard that is somewhat unlevel (by inches) and want to lay a teak “deck” of sorts (that will be only about an inch or so high ) to make that area pretty and inviting. i thought to put sand down first so the wood will be level but how do i keep the grass and weeds from growing under and up through the “decking”? newspapers on the ground, then sand? tks (this is meant to be a very inexpensive little project)

  11. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  12. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  13. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  14. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  15. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  16. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  17. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  18. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  19. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  20. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  21. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  22. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  23. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  24. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  25. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  26. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  27. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  28. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  29. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  30. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  31. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  32. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  33. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  34. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  35. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  36. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  37. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  38. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  39. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  40. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  41. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  42. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  43. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  44. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  45. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  46. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  47. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  48. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  49. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  50. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  51. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  52. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  53. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  54. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  55. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  56. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  57. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  58. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  59. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  60. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  61. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  62. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  63. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  64. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  65. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  66. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  67. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  68. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  69. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  70. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  71. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  72. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  73. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  74. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  75. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  76. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  77. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  78. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  79. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  80. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  81. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  82. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  83. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  84. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  85. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  86. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  87. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  88. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  89. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  90. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  91. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  92. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  93. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  94. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  95. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  96. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  97. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  98. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  99. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  100. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  101. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  102. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  103. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  104. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  105. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  106. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  107. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  108. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  109. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  110. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  111. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  112. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  113. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  114. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  115. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  116. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  117. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  118. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  119. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  120. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  121. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  122. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  123. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  124. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  125. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  126. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  127. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  128. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  129. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  130. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  131. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  132. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  133. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  134. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  135. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  136. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  137. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  138. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  139. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  140. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  141. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  142. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  143. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  144. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  145. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  146. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  147. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  148. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  149. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  150. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  151. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  152. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  153. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  154. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  155. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  156. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  157. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  158. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  159. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  160. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  161. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  162. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  163. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  164. this is an exemplification essay for my 11th year english class and I’d be delighted if you could read it and give me some feedback. thank you
    by the way it’s not finished.

    In the Village
    Stepping out the backdoor into the ruins of my backyard, I was greeted with the raunchy odor of the garbage can which was surrounded with flies. As I walk further, all I could see is a bed of gray grass encompassed with a thriving forest of six different types of weeds; crabgrass, chickweed, dandelion, clovers and so on. You name it, we got it. Beside the house is a confined area, which I recall contained a garden. The garden was founded at the time our family moved into the house. It was a lot of hard work, that garden. My father prepared the soil, my brothers removed the weeds, my mother would water it daily and my little sister and I would sing to it because studies show that singing to plants, helps them grow. On good days the garden would receive pleasant rainfall, but sometimes for weeks on end, our garden was left battling the dry, scorching weather. Not even the bipolar Texas weather could stop us; the product of our hard work soon paid off. Our garden sprung up the prettiest flowers you had ever seen, but a lot can happen in seven years. Overtime, we all got caught up in our personal lives which left the garden neglected and what is now a flower graveyard. This garden summarizes the saying “It takes a village to raise a child”. Like a child, the garden could not have been maintained by one person. It took our whole family to nurture and care for it. Children come in contact with many different types of people who shape their identity whether it is parents, brothers and sisters, school teachers, etc. The whole community has an essential role to play in the growth and development of a child.
    The term “village” refers to people beyond the immediate family. It’s someone who has affected the child’s life in one way or another. They can be those firemen that came to the rescue before you could even hang up the phone or those policemen that arrested the thief at 7-11. I remember at seven years old, being frightened and waking up in the middle of the night, scared that the “bad people” will come get me. This caused my father to take me to the police station one day and inform them of my problem. A police officer then sat me down and talked to me and told me I shouldn’t worry about the “bad people” because it wasn’t my job. He then told me it was his job to worry about them. He then said that he along with other police officers rode up and down the neighborhood at night making sure everything was all right. After that day, I didn’t have another problem with that fear ever again. Although at that moment, I didn’t think about how much of an impact he left on my life; I now realize how much a stranger could affect and individual. By engaging in unexpected, friendly conversation with strangers, our lives can be affected in ways that are extraordinary.
    Identically, even that total stranger at Wal-Mart can influence an individual’s life. For example, we’ve all been through the situations similar to bumping into someone’s cart while doing grocery shopping. The person will either have a forgiving response such as “excuse me”, and “I’m sorry” or have a totally different take on the accident and respond in a rude manner. That stranger has just taught the child unintentionally. The child, when being in another incident of that nature, will recall the previous experience and will handle it in the way that is familiar to them. From these strangers, we are taught manners, social interaction and forgiveness.

  165. this is an exemplification essay for my 11th year english class and I’d be delighted if you could read it and give me some feedback. thank you
    by the way it’s not finished.

    In the Village
    Stepping out the backdoor into the ruins of my backyard, I was greeted with the raunchy odor of the garbage can which was surrounded with flies. As I walk further, all I could see is a bed of gray grass encompassed with a thriving forest of six different types of weeds; crabgrass, chickweed, dandelion, clovers and so on. You name it, we got it. Beside the house is a confined area, which I recall contained a garden. The garden was founded at the time our family moved into the house. It was a lot of hard work, that garden. My father prepared the soil, my brothers removed the weeds, my mother would water it daily and my little sister and I would sing to it because studies show that singing to plants, helps them grow. On good days the garden would receive pleasant rainfall, but sometimes for weeks on end, our garden was left battling the dry, scorching weather. Not even the bipolar Texas weather could stop us; the product of our hard work soon paid off. Our garden sprung up the prettiest flowers you had ever seen, but a lot can happen in seven years. Overtime, we all got caught up in our personal lives which left the garden neglected and what is now a flower graveyard. This garden summarizes the saying “It takes a village to raise a child”. Like a child, the garden could not have been maintained by one person. It took our whole family to nurture and care for it. Children come in contact with many different types of people who shape their identity whether it is parents, brothers and sisters, school teachers, etc. The whole community has an essential role to play in the growth and development of a child.
    The term “village” refers to people beyond the immediate family. It’s someone who has affected the child’s life in one way or another. They can be those firemen that came to the rescue before you could even hang up the phone or those policemen that arrested the thief at 7-11. I remember at seven years old, being frightened and waking up in the middle of the night, scared that the “bad people” will come get me. This caused my father to take me to the police station one day and inform them of my problem. A police officer then sat me down and talked to me and told me I shouldn’t worry about the “bad people” because it wasn’t my job. He then told me it was his job to worry about them. He then said that he along with other police officers rode up and down the neighborhood at night making sure everything was all right. After that day, I didn’t have another problem with that fear ever again. Although at that moment, I didn’t think about how much of an impact he left on my life; I now realize how much a stranger could affect and individual. By engaging in unexpected, friendly conversation with strangers, our lives can be affected in ways that are extraordinary.
    Identically, even that total stranger at Wal-Mart can influence an individual’s life. For example, we’ve all been through the situations similar to bumping into someone’s cart while doing grocery shopping. The person will either have a forgiving response such as “excuse me”, and “I’m sorry” or have a totally different take on the accident and respond in a rude manner. That stranger has just taught the child unintentionally. The child, when being in another incident of that nature, will recall the previous experience and will handle it in the way that is familiar to them. From these strangers, we are taught manners, social interaction and forgiveness.

  166. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  167. At the moment i use Evergreen Complete to feed the lawn and kill the weeds. This comes in granular form which has to be then washed in after a few days. Is there a combined feed and weed that comes in liquid form which i can put in a backpack and spray? Or if it’s better, is there seperate products i can use to kill the weeds then feed the lawn. My lawn is 350m2 so preferably the liquid has to come in large containers. UK products only please.

  168. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  169. I am currently a sophomore in college and am looking to go into a scientific field.. I.e genetic engineering, neuropharmacology, human enhancement…

    Unfortunately I still have many years before I can say I truly understand organic chemistry. I’m full of ambition and simply lack the knowledge to use my ambition at the moment.

    So… I turn to you..

    What do I need to manipulate genetic code in a laboratory? Does your average college have the equipment for genetic engineering? Are there any labs I could get my hands on that walk you through the process?

    What would I be realistically limited to?… I have been watching UCLA lectures online and its stated that genetically manipulating things in a lab is not too difficult. They say making a ‘glow-fly’ is extremely simple… How simple?

    I know what I want to do I just don’t know how to yet. I had several ideas, but I have no idea how realistic they are.

    How hard would it be to make grass immune to weeds? Or even better tell grass when to stop growing? Grass growth slows way down during the winter why not keep it that way year round? What about ‘Glow-Grass’?

    Say I took a fruit fly and wanted to change the manufacturing of a growth hormone making it significantly bigger than your normal fruit fly.. Theoretically how big could I get the fly? What determines its maximum size? Could I make the fly extremely hairy?

    Just for fun… The hallucinogen excreted by certain toads obviously this is the product of it’s genes. Could someone take the gene from the toad and put it in a spider? How hard would this be?

    If you have any insight to any of these questions, especially how I would go about doing these things I’d greatly appreciate it. I am able to take a self-study chem class and would love to take it if its possible for me to do any of these things on my own with a little hard reading.

    Thanks!

  170. God and St. Francis Discussing Lawns

    GOD: St. Francis, you know all about gardens and nature. What in the world is going on down there in the USA? What happened to the dandelions, violets, thistle and stuff I started eons ago? I had a perfect, no-maintenance garden plan. Those plants grow in any type of soil, withstand drought and multiply with abandon. The nectar from the long lasting blossoms attracts butterflies, honeybees and flocks of songbirds.

    I expected to see a vast garden of colors by now. But all I see are these green rectangles.

    ST. FRANCIS: It’s the tribes that settled there, Lord. The Suburbanites. They started calling your flowers weeds and went to great lengths to kill them and replace them with grass.

    GOD: Grass? But it’s so boring. It’s not colorful. It doesn’t attract butterflies, birds and bees, only grubs and sod worms. It’s temperamental with temperatures. Do these Suburbanites really want all that grass growing there?

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently so, Lord. They go to great pains to grow it and keep it green. They begin each spring by fertilizing grass and poisoning any other plant that crops up in the lawn.

    GOD: The spring rains and warm weather probably make grass grow really fast. That must make the Suburbanites happy.

    ST. FRANCIS: Apparently not, Lord. As soon as it grows a little, they cut it, sometimes twice a week.

    GOD: They cut it? Do they then bale it like hay?

    ST. FRANCIS: Not exactly Lord. Most of them rake it up and put it in bags.

    GOD: They bag it? Why? Is it a cash crop? Do they sell it?

    ST. FRANCIS: No, sir — just the opposite. They pay to throw it away.

    GOD: Now, let me get this straight. They fertilize grass so it will grow. And when it does grow, they cut it off and pay to throw it away?

    ST. FRANCIS: Yes, sir.

    GOD: These Suburbanites must be relieved in the summer when we cut back on the rain and turn up the heat. That surely slows the growth and saves them a lot of work.

    ST. FRANCIS: You aren’t going to believe this, Lord. When the grass stops growing so fast, they drag out hoses and pay more money to water it so they can continue to mow it and pay to get rid of it.

    GOD: What nonsense. At least they kept some of the trees. That was a sheer stoke of genius, if I do say so myself. The trees grow leaves in the spring to provide beauty and shade in the summer. In the autumn they fall to the ground and form a natural blanket to keep moisture in the soil and protect the trees and bushes. Plus, as they rot, the leaves form compost to enhance the soil. It’s a natural circle of life.

    ST. FRANCIS: You’d better sit down, Lord. The Suburbanites have drawn a new circle. As soon as the leaves fall, they rake them into great piles and pay to have them hauled away.

    GOD: No. What do they do to protect the shrub and tree roots in the winter and to keep the soil moist and loose?

    ST. FRANCIS: After throwing away the leaves, they go out and buy something which they call mulch. They haul it home and spread it around in place of the leaves.

    GOD: And where do they get this mulch?

    ST. FRANCIS: They cut down trees and grind them up to make the mulch.

    GOD: Enough! I don’t want to think about this anymore. St. Catherine, you’re in charge of the arts. What movie have you scheduled for us tonight?

    ST. CATHERINE: Dumb and Dumber, Lord. It’s a real stupid movie about …

    GOD: Never mind, I think I just heard the whole story from St. Francis

  171. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  172. My lawn appears to have grass at first glance, but it doesn’t… It is actually filled with some sort of thin green fast growing weed which grows super fast… how do we eliminate this weed.

  173. My lawn appears to have grass at first glance, but it doesn’t… It is actually filled with some sort of thin green fast growing weed which grows super fast… how do we eliminate this weed.

  174. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  175. I have a Sago palm planted in the ground with mulch around it but the grass and weeds grow thru the mulch and I’m affraid it will eventually sufficate my palm. Can I do something besides spraying weed killer around my plant to stop the grass from growing in that area? Please tell me what you suggest?

  176. I accumulate large quatities of grass cuttings and also have access to large quantities of sawmill waste (sawdust of varying grades) Over several years a mountain of composted material has accumulated. I have mixed in the heap chicken manure over the years. I have incorporated large quantities of the mix into my garden now the soil has a very open texture. It occurs to me that I might be overdoing the mixture. The vegetable crops do not seem to be overly impressive (mostly root veg carrots,parsnip,beetroot etc). I also use strips of old carpet between the rows to inhibit weed growth and weight the carpet down with coal fire ash to stop wind from lifting the carpet. Weeds still persist but are definitely reduced in number. At the end of the season the ash is rotovated into the soil. Anybody have any comments on this. Sensible answers please.

  177. I am fixing to plant Zoysia grass for my lawn and my neighbor has St. Augustine. I believe Zoysia is more dense and will overtake his lawn. I need to know how to keep the two seperate(from growing over one another) while still being able to mow without obstruction. What I really want to avoid is his grass from invading my lawn. I think those metal boarders you can hammer into the ground would work, but how high to I need it to be above ground level to effectively keep the lawns seperated?

  178. My lawn appears to have grass at first glance, but it doesn’t… It is actually filled with some sort of thin green fast growing weed which grows super fast… how do we eliminate this weed.

  179. My lawn appears to have grass at first glance, but it doesn’t… It is actually filled with some sort of thin green fast growing weed which grows super fast… how do we eliminate this weed.

  180. I cut out a plant bedding area in my landscaped lawn. I chose not to lay a weed and grass barrier before plant materials. Now I’m pulling long rhizomes, digging evaded areas and dropping baking soda to prevent further grass growth inside the bed. How long and how many applications of baking soda will stop the invasive grasses?

  181. I want to section off my garden and have part of it covered in bark. At present it’s largely mud, thanks to my dogs having worn the grass down and a lot of appalling North East England weather.

    Can I lay old carpet as a weed/grass suppressant and then lay the bark over the top. I know a plastic membrane is advised but I am on the worlds tightest budget!

    Thank you.

  182. I have a Sago palm planted in the ground with mulch around it but the grass and weeds grow thru the mulch and I’m affraid it will eventually sufficate my palm. Can I do something besides spraying weed killer around my plant to stop the grass from growing in that area? Please tell me what you suggest?

  183. I have a Sago palm planted in the ground with mulch around it but the grass and weeds grow thru the mulch and I’m affraid it will eventually sufficate my palm. Can I do something besides spraying weed killer around my plant to stop the grass from growing in that area? Please tell me what you suggest?

  184. I have fruit trees in the garden.I dont want to harm them,but I want to stop the growth of weeds,grass and unwanted plants growing rapidly all over the place.Give me low cost expert solutions.

  185. We just bought this house 5 years ago and made flower beds around the house. We are having problems keeping the grass and weeds from grow in there. Can anyone tell me what I can use to stop the growth of grass and weeds so I don’t have to always weed my flower beds so often.

  186. My lawn appears to have grass at first glance, but it doesn’t… It is actually filled with some sort of thin green fast growing weed which grows super fast… how do we eliminate this weed.

  187. I have a Sago palm planted in the ground with mulch around it but the grass and weeds grow thru the mulch and I’m affraid it will eventually sufficate my palm. Can I do something besides spraying weed killer around my plant to stop the grass from growing in that area? Please tell me what you suggest?

  188. I want to section off my garden and have part of it covered in bark. At present it’s largely mud, thanks to my dogs having worn the grass down and a lot of appalling North East England weather.

    Can I lay old carpet as a weed/grass suppressant and then lay the bark over the top. I know a plastic membrane is advised but I am on the worlds tightest budget!

    Thank you.

  189. I cut out a plant bedding area in my landscaped lawn. I chose not to lay a weed and grass barrier before plant materials. Now I’m pulling long rhizomes, digging evaded areas and dropping baking soda to prevent further grass growth inside the bed. How long and how many applications of baking soda will stop the invasive grasses?

  190. My lawn appears to have grass at first glance, but it doesn’t… It is actually filled with some sort of thin green fast growing weed which grows super fast… how do we eliminate this weed.

  191. My lawn appears to have grass at first glance, but it doesn’t… It is actually filled with some sort of thin green fast growing weed which grows super fast… how do we eliminate this weed.

  192. I have a Sago palm planted in the ground with mulch around it but the grass and weeds grow thru the mulch and I’m affraid it will eventually sufficate my palm. Can I do something besides spraying weed killer around my plant to stop the grass from growing in that area? Please tell me what you suggest?

  193. We just bought this house 5 years ago and made flower beds around the house. We are having problems keeping the grass and weeds from grow in there. Can anyone tell me what I can use to stop the growth of grass and weeds so I don’t have to always weed my flower beds so often.

  194. I have a Sago palm planted in the ground with mulch around it but the grass and weeds grow thru the mulch and I’m affraid it will eventually sufficate my palm. Can I do something besides spraying weed killer around my plant to stop the grass from growing in that area? Please tell me what you suggest?

  195. I want to section off my garden and have part of it covered in bark. At present it’s largely mud, thanks to my dogs having worn the grass down and a lot of appalling North East England weather.

    Can I lay old carpet as a weed/grass suppressant and then lay the bark over the top. I know a plastic membrane is advised but I am on the worlds tightest budget!

    Thank you.

  196. I want to section off my garden and have part of it covered in bark. At present it’s largely mud, thanks to my dogs having worn the grass down and a lot of appalling North East England weather.

    Can I lay old carpet as a weed/grass suppressant and then lay the bark over the top. I know a plastic membrane is advised but I am on the worlds tightest budget!

    Thank you.

  197. I have a Sago palm planted in the ground with mulch around it but the grass and weeds grow thru the mulch and I’m affraid it will eventually sufficate my palm. Can I do something besides spraying weed killer around my plant to stop the grass from growing in that area? Please tell me what you suggest?

  198. I cut out a plant bedding area in my landscaped lawn. I chose not to lay a weed and grass barrier before plant materials. Now I’m pulling long rhizomes, digging evaded areas and dropping baking soda to prevent further grass growth inside the bed. How long and how many applications of baking soda will stop the invasive grasses?

  199. I’m weeding a flowerbed and will be planting in it afterwards. But there is a square foot that I want to stay as bare soil indefinetly (ie no grass or weeds growing from it).

    If I salt that patch will it stop growth and will it harm the rest of the bed? Is there a better way? I just want it to stay as it is.
    As people seem to be wondering, I’m burying a pet in the corner of the bed and think the depth is quite shallow, so can’t be digging up weeds that grow over the grave (as I would dig up the pet).

    I wanted a blank space I could put a marker on, but it looks like I will be best pulling up weeds/grass as it arrives.

    Thanks all, any further ideas are appreciated.

  200. I have a Sago palm planted in the ground with mulch around it but the grass and weeds grow thru the mulch and I’m affraid it will eventually sufficate my palm. Can I do something besides spraying weed killer around my plant to stop the grass from growing in that area? Please tell me what you suggest?

  201. I have a Sago palm planted in the ground with mulch around it but the grass and weeds grow thru the mulch and I’m affraid it will eventually sufficate my palm. Can I do something besides spraying weed killer around my plant to stop the grass from growing in that area? Please tell me what you suggest?

  202. Got a letter from homeowners association asking to get rid of weeds in driveway and beds. I’m not into gardening so I don’t even know how weeds look!

  203. My lawn appears to have grass at first glance, but it doesn’t… It is actually filled with some sort of thin green fast growing weed which grows super fast… how do we eliminate this weed.

  204. We just bought this house 5 years ago and made flower beds around the house. We are having problems keeping the grass and weeds from grow in there. Can anyone tell me what I can use to stop the growth of grass and weeds so I don’t have to always weed my flower beds so often.

  205. I have a Sago palm planted in the ground with mulch around it but the grass and weeds grow thru the mulch and I’m affraid it will eventually sufficate my palm. Can I do something besides spraying weed killer around my plant to stop the grass from growing in that area? Please tell me what you suggest?

  206. I want to section off my garden and have part of it covered in bark. At present it’s largely mud, thanks to my dogs having worn the grass down and a lot of appalling North East England weather.

    Can I lay old carpet as a weed/grass suppressant and then lay the bark over the top. I know a plastic membrane is advised but I am on the worlds tightest budget!

    Thank you.

  207. My lawn appears to have grass at first glance, but it doesn’t… It is actually filled with some sort of thin green fast growing weed which grows super fast… how do we eliminate this weed.

  208. I want to section off my garden and have part of it covered in bark. At present it’s largely mud, thanks to my dogs having worn the grass down and a lot of appalling North East England weather.

    Can I lay old carpet as a weed/grass suppressant and then lay the bark over the top. I know a plastic membrane is advised but I am on the worlds tightest budget!

    Thank you.

  209. I want to section off my garden and have part of it covered in bark. At present it’s largely mud, thanks to my dogs having worn the grass down and a lot of appalling North East England weather.

    Can I lay old carpet as a weed/grass suppressant and then lay the bark over the top. I know a plastic membrane is advised but I am on the worlds tightest budget!

    Thank you.

  210. I cut out a plant bedding area in my landscaped lawn. I chose not to lay a weed and grass barrier before plant materials. Now I’m pulling long rhizomes, digging evaded areas and dropping baking soda to prevent further grass growth inside the bed. How long and how many applications of baking soda will stop the invasive grasses?

  211. I want to section off my garden and have part of it covered in bark. At present it’s largely mud, thanks to my dogs having worn the grass down and a lot of appalling North East England weather.

    Can I lay old carpet as a weed/grass suppressant and then lay the bark over the top. I know a plastic membrane is advised but I am on the worlds tightest budget!

    Thank you.

  212. I cut out a plant bedding area in my landscaped lawn. I chose not to lay a weed and grass barrier before plant materials. Now I’m pulling long rhizomes, digging evaded areas and dropping baking soda to prevent further grass growth inside the bed. How long and how many applications of baking soda will stop the invasive grasses?

  213. I cut out a plant bedding area in my landscaped lawn. I chose not to lay a weed and grass barrier before plant materials. Now I’m pulling long rhizomes, digging evaded areas and dropping baking soda to prevent further grass growth inside the bed. How long and how many applications of baking soda will stop the invasive grasses?

  214. I’m weeding a flowerbed and will be planting in it afterwards. But there is a square foot that I want to stay as bare soil indefinetly (ie no grass or weeds growing from it).

    If I salt that patch will it stop growth and will it harm the rest of the bed? Is there a better way? I just want it to stay as it is.
    As people seem to be wondering, I’m burying a pet in the corner of the bed and think the depth is quite shallow, so can’t be digging up weeds that grow over the grave (as I would dig up the pet).

    I wanted a blank space I could put a marker on, but it looks like I will be best pulling up weeds/grass as it arrives.

    Thanks all, any further ideas are appreciated.

  215. I want to section off my garden and have part of it covered in bark. At present it’s largely mud, thanks to my dogs having worn the grass down and a lot of appalling North East England weather.

    Can I lay old carpet as a weed/grass suppressant and then lay the bark over the top. I know a plastic membrane is advised but I am on the worlds tightest budget!

    Thank you.

  216. I have a Sago palm planted in the ground with mulch around it but the grass and weeds grow thru the mulch and I’m affraid it will eventually sufficate my palm. Can I do something besides spraying weed killer around my plant to stop the grass from growing in that area? Please tell me what you suggest?

  217. We just bought this house 5 years ago and made flower beds around the house. We are having problems keeping the grass and weeds from grow in there. Can anyone tell me what I can use to stop the growth of grass and weeds so I don’t have to always weed my flower beds so often.

  218. I have a Sago palm planted in the ground with mulch around it but the grass and weeds grow thru the mulch and I’m affraid it will eventually sufficate my palm. Can I do something besides spraying weed killer around my plant to stop the grass from growing in that area? Please tell me what you suggest?

  219. I cut out a plant bedding area in my landscaped lawn. I chose not to lay a weed and grass barrier before plant materials. Now I’m pulling long rhizomes, digging evaded areas and dropping baking soda to prevent further grass growth inside the bed. How long and how many applications of baking soda will stop the invasive grasses?

  220. I cut out a plant bedding area in my landscaped lawn. I chose not to lay a weed and grass barrier before plant materials. Now I’m pulling long rhizomes, digging evaded areas and dropping baking soda to prevent further grass growth inside the bed. How long and how many applications of baking soda will stop the invasive grasses?

  221. I want to section off my garden and have part of it covered in bark. At present it’s largely mud, thanks to my dogs having worn the grass down and a lot of appalling North East England weather.

    Can I lay old carpet as a weed/grass suppressant and then lay the bark over the top. I know a plastic membrane is advised but I am on the worlds tightest budget!

    Thank you.

  222. I cut out a plant bedding area in my landscaped lawn. I chose not to lay a weed and grass barrier before plant materials. Now I’m pulling long rhizomes, digging evaded areas and dropping baking soda to prevent further grass growth inside the bed. How long and how many applications of baking soda will stop the invasive grasses?

  223. I want to section off my garden and have part of it covered in bark. At present it’s largely mud, thanks to my dogs having worn the grass down and a lot of appalling North East England weather.

    Can I lay old carpet as a weed/grass suppressant and then lay the bark over the top. I know a plastic membrane is advised but I am on the worlds tightest budget!

    Thank you.

  224. My lawn appears to have grass at first glance, but it doesn’t… It is actually filled with some sort of thin green fast growing weed which grows super fast… how do we eliminate this weed.

  225. Is there any product that will eradicate Poeanne grass/weed from my yard. My Tru-Green lawn service says he has no chemical that will kill this grass. It spreads over the sod and kills the sod.

  226. I’m weeding a flowerbed and will be planting in it afterwards. But there is a square foot that I want to stay as bare soil indefinetly (ie no grass or weeds growing from it).

    If I salt that patch will it stop growth and will it harm the rest of the bed? Is there a better way? I just want it to stay as it is.
    As people seem to be wondering, I’m burying a pet in the corner of the bed and think the depth is quite shallow, so can’t be digging up weeds that grow over the grave (as I would dig up the pet).

    I wanted a blank space I could put a marker on, but it looks like I will be best pulling up weeds/grass as it arrives.

    Thanks all, any further ideas are appreciated.

  227. I want to section off my garden and have part of it covered in bark. At present it’s largely mud, thanks to my dogs having worn the grass down and a lot of appalling North East England weather.

    Can I lay old carpet as a weed/grass suppressant and then lay the bark over the top. I know a plastic membrane is advised but I am on the worlds tightest budget!

    Thank you.

  228. I’m weeding a flowerbed and will be planting in it afterwards. But there is a square foot that I want to stay as bare soil indefinetly (ie no grass or weeds growing from it).

    If I salt that patch will it stop growth and will it harm the rest of the bed? Is there a better way? I just want it to stay as it is.
    As people seem to be wondering, I’m burying a pet in the corner of the bed and think the depth is quite shallow, so can’t be digging up weeds that grow over the grave (as I would dig up the pet).

    I wanted a blank space I could put a marker on, but it looks like I will be best pulling up weeds/grass as it arrives.

    Thanks all, any further ideas are appreciated.

  229. My lawn appears to have grass at first glance, but it doesn’t… It is actually filled with some sort of thin green fast growing weed which grows super fast… how do we eliminate this weed.

  230. I cut out a plant bedding area in my landscaped lawn. I chose not to lay a weed and grass barrier before plant materials. Now I’m pulling long rhizomes, digging evaded areas and dropping baking soda to prevent further grass growth inside the bed. How long and how many applications of baking soda will stop the invasive grasses?

  231. We just bought this house 5 years ago and made flower beds around the house. We are having problems keeping the grass and weeds from grow in there. Can anyone tell me what I can use to stop the growth of grass and weeds so I don’t have to always weed my flower beds so often.

  232. I want to section off my garden and have part of it covered in bark. At present it’s largely mud, thanks to my dogs having worn the grass down and a lot of appalling North East England weather.

    Can I lay old carpet as a weed/grass suppressant and then lay the bark over the top. I know a plastic membrane is advised but I am on the worlds tightest budget!

    Thank you.

  233. Got a letter from homeowners association asking to get rid of weeds in driveway and beds. I’m not into gardening so I don’t even know how weeds look!

  234. We just bought this house 5 years ago and made flower beds around the house. We are having problems keeping the grass and weeds from grow in there. Can anyone tell me what I can use to stop the growth of grass and weeds so I don’t have to always weed my flower beds so often.

  235. I’m weeding a flowerbed and will be planting in it afterwards. But there is a square foot that I want to stay as bare soil indefinetly (ie no grass or weeds growing from it).

    If I salt that patch will it stop growth and will it harm the rest of the bed? Is there a better way? I just want it to stay as it is.
    As people seem to be wondering, I’m burying a pet in the corner of the bed and think the depth is quite shallow, so can’t be digging up weeds that grow over the grave (as I would dig up the pet).

    I wanted a blank space I could put a marker on, but it looks like I will be best pulling up weeds/grass as it arrives.

    Thanks all, any further ideas are appreciated.

  236. It’s still has weeds and sparce growth after years. Should I put down seed with a spreader and them put down weed and feed, or should I continue with just weed and feed as I have for the last year.?

  237. I want to section off my garden and have part of it covered in bark. At present it’s largely mud, thanks to my dogs having worn the grass down and a lot of appalling North East England weather.

    Can I lay old carpet as a weed/grass suppressant and then lay the bark over the top. I know a plastic membrane is advised but I am on the worlds tightest budget!

    Thank you.

  238. I want to section off my garden and have part of it covered in bark. At present it’s largely mud, thanks to my dogs having worn the grass down and a lot of appalling North East England weather.

    Can I lay old carpet as a weed/grass suppressant and then lay the bark over the top. I know a plastic membrane is advised but I am on the worlds tightest budget!

    Thank you.

  239. I want to section off my garden and have part of it covered in bark. At present it’s largely mud, thanks to my dogs having worn the grass down and a lot of appalling North East England weather.

    Can I lay old carpet as a weed/grass suppressant and then lay the bark over the top. I know a plastic membrane is advised but I am on the worlds tightest budget!

    Thank you.

  240. I cut out a plant bedding area in my landscaped lawn. I chose not to lay a weed and grass barrier before plant materials. Now I’m pulling long rhizomes, digging evaded areas and dropping baking soda to prevent further grass growth inside the bed. How long and how many applications of baking soda will stop the invasive grasses?

  241. We just bought this house 5 years ago and made flower beds around the house. We are having problems keeping the grass and weeds from grow in there. Can anyone tell me what I can use to stop the growth of grass and weeds so I don’t have to always weed my flower beds so often.

  242. I cut out a plant bedding area in my landscaped lawn. I chose not to lay a weed and grass barrier before plant materials. Now I’m pulling long rhizomes, digging evaded areas and dropping baking soda to prevent further grass growth inside the bed. How long and how many applications of baking soda will stop the invasive grasses?

  243. I cut out a plant bedding area in my landscaped lawn. I chose not to lay a weed and grass barrier before plant materials. Now I’m pulling long rhizomes, digging evaded areas and dropping baking soda to prevent further grass growth inside the bed. How long and how many applications of baking soda will stop the invasive grasses?

  244. I’m weeding a flowerbed and will be planting in it afterwards. But there is a square foot that I want to stay as bare soil indefinetly (ie no grass or weeds growing from it).

    If I salt that patch will it stop growth and will it harm the rest of the bed? Is there a better way? I just want it to stay as it is.
    As people seem to be wondering, I’m burying a pet in the corner of the bed and think the depth is quite shallow, so can’t be digging up weeds that grow over the grave (as I would dig up the pet).

    I wanted a blank space I could put a marker on, but it looks like I will be best pulling up weeds/grass as it arrives.

    Thanks all, any further ideas are appreciated.

  245. I just planted a new lawn, half the lawn came in luscious and beautifully green because water spreads on it evenly (and I think the shade from my house is helping) while the other half, furthest away from my house, has bare spots where too much water constantly pools when I water. I think it may be receiving too much water in those area’s causing bad growth of the grass. I’m not sure what to do. Suggestions?

  246. I have to do a Planning and Design Lab for Biology and I need some more background information as to why fewer plants grow under pine trees as opposed to other trees.

  247. My garden is abit of a jungle at the moment, the weeds are taller than me 5ft 3! I need to find a weed killer that works so I can start my garden from scratch, any ideas on what will tackle weeds of this height? And where can I get it?

  248. Got a letter from homeowners association asking to get rid of weeds in driveway and beds. I’m not into gardening so I don’t even know how weeds look!

  249. I want to section off my garden and have part of it covered in bark. At present it’s largely mud, thanks to my dogs having worn the grass down and a lot of appalling North East England weather.

    Can I lay old carpet as a weed/grass suppressant and then lay the bark over the top. I know a plastic membrane is advised but I am on the worlds tightest budget!

    Thank you.

  250. I cut out a plant bedding area in my landscaped lawn. I chose not to lay a weed and grass barrier before plant materials. Now I’m pulling long rhizomes, digging evaded areas and dropping baking soda to prevent further grass growth inside the bed. How long and how many applications of baking soda will stop the invasive grasses?

  251. My lawn looks more like a garden than a grass lawn. Are they to be treated as weeds and get a weed killer? I am afraid to further damage it. I love flowers but not on my lawn. thanks

  252. We just bought this house 5 years ago and made flower beds around the house. We are having problems keeping the grass and weeds from grow in there. Can anyone tell me what I can use to stop the growth of grass and weeds so I don’t have to always weed my flower beds so often.

  253. I live in Arizona, and the lawn in front of my apartment is barren. How can i overhaul it and grow a nice lawn? And dont mention the fact that i live in arizona, because one of my neighbors has nice clipped hedges
    what should i do about the weeds?

  254. About 1 month ago I redid my yard. Both front and back were were reseeded Bermuda in back and tall fescue in front. The front yard looks good for the exception of weeds on half the yard and in the back is the same. When I fertilize in the next month should I use fertilizer with weed control or not yet? Also should I overseed while I am at it or wait until fall?

  255. i cut a tree down and another one grows next to the one i cut down,what can i use to stop trees from growing,i have use stump out and motor oil.

  256. We are moving to a new house in 5 weeks, it’s a fresh start after a tough year, we would like to plant a tree the day we move in, can we do so at this time of year, we are in North Yorkshire (UK) and house is quite exposed to the weather. Any suggestions? Thanks.

  257. My Rose bushes are so green and pretty right now, but during the summer I have a problem with black spots and I can’t keep them blooming all summer. How much water does Rose Bushes require and what’s the best thing to put on them?

  258. I’ve started a little garden. Grass and weeds keeps growing up and around my flowers. Is there anything that I can do to halt it’s growth?

  259. I have tried to spray it and have tried crabgrass killer last year, but nothing seems to do anything to it. I am a single mother and love to do yard work but this is a really ittitating problem I would love to get rid of.

  260. I have 2 weeks off work over the holidays to enjoy the lovely summer weather and would love to DIY the glass house that is in the backyard of the house I rent. However, I have never done this before and need LOTS of help and ideas. Are there any serious glass house growers out there? All I know right now is that I need to get rid of the cobwebs (shiver!) and put weed mat on the grass to stop the grass/weeds coming back. I already have a couple of stands in there so I can put pot plants in, and need more ideas on what to grow.
    Thanks!

  261. I am in high school and have never smoked weed. I want to try it once because i feel it is an experience that you must go through. However i am very serious about sports and train weekly with hard workouts and training. I don’t smoke cigs or anything like that. If i try weed once what will the effect be on my performance and how long will it take for my body to fully recover?

  262. My lawn appears to have grass at first glance, but it doesn’t… It is actually filled with some sort of thin green fast growing weed which grows super fast… how do we eliminate this weed.

  263. I have a Sago palm planted in the ground with mulch around it but the grass and weeds grow thru the mulch and I’m affraid it will eventually sufficate my palm. Can I do something besides spraying weed killer around my plant to stop the grass from growing in that area? Please tell me what you suggest?

  264. We are over run with nut grass and other weeds in every one of our new mulch beds which are between 8″ to 12″ deep. The roots grow horizontally and extremely difficult to get all of them.

    We’ve tried edging of varying heights, all kinds of chemicals, different mulches and rocks, weed-stop mesh material, and even completely removed the sod underneath on a new bed. Funny thing was a combination of the last two ended up with weeds & nut grass the fastest.

    Attention professional landscapers and Agriculture majors: please, please, please let us know if a silver bullet exists to eliminate (or make our chore a lot more manageable) this problem. If we don’t find a solution soon, we may just abandon the beds entirely and let the grass “win”!

  265. This is the first time I’ve purchased roses. I know how often to feed ‘em because the directions are one the box. :)
    Almost forget, I have heard using egg shells in the soil are good for the roses. Is this true? Any other tips/tricks I should be aware of? Thanks!

  266. I just bought a new house and I have lots of roses in my front yard I am lost on how to care of them. And they are dieing. :( I am not a person with a green thumb. I never had roses before. Help with all the rose help I can get.
    Thanks

  267. We have a small lake at the local community park and its in dismal condition. From time to time the fish just up and die and the water is murky. I have offered to help by taking responsibility to get it cleaned up. Only I havent a clue where to start. Any ideas would be most appreciated.

  268. Hi, my friend has just bought me this chinese elm bonsai tree. To be honest im a bit lost as to what to do with it, ive searched various websites but im no alan titchmarsh…. so a bonsai tree probably wasnt the greatest present to buy me..

    Anyone got any tips to help it live :) ?
    ~Chris

  269. hi , i need hepl and advice, how come that my grass is turning brown and dying ? since i watered them in the morning and afternoon? i understand the heat and these portions are not in a shady area unlike my others. but watering them a lot makes them still dry and dying, please tell me what to do, and some portions of it are completely bald, what sould i do with that portion, im working hard for my yard but this area is not satisfying me, please help me, God bless you.
    i would like to attach photos on my questions regarding what type of plants i pictured, but i dont know how to do attachement to have people view it, please help me what the procedure is.. thx God bless

  270. I live in New Jersey… couple grass questions…
    -When should I apply the fertilizer with crabgass preventer?
    -I have some bare spots, so should I seed first, then apply the crabgrass stuff later, or reverse?
    - I have moss in my backyard. It seems like it is spreading. How do I stop it?

  271. And other unwanted growths for that matter. There are things growing in the lawn that can not be picked with a manual weed picker. I’m talking about vine like plants that look like clovers…

  272. I was talking with my mother about gardening, and I want to try it out… but I have little to no experience.
    What kind of plants are good to grow in North Florida this time of year, that aren’t extremely complicated to care for? How do I prepare the soil for that type of plant? The yard gets a lot of sun, if that helps..

  273. We start watering when the freezing temperatures stop, and we fertilize at the beginning and end of the season, and our grass still seems on the yellow side. However, when we drive around, we notice that some people just have super green grass. What are they doing that I don’t know about?

  274. It’s still has weeds and sparce growth after years. Should I put down seed with a spreader and them put down weed and feed, or should I continue with just weed and feed as I have for the last year.?

  275. I pulled out weed roots like crazy before I planted.How can I get these weeds and grass to stop growing in my garden for good?I don’t want to have to replant.

  276. My 5 year old boy has asthma, and I have been giving him breathing treatments with albuterol and pulmicourt, but nothing seems to be helping him. The breathing treatment will help him for a little bit but it seems like just a few minutes later he is still wheezing and coughing and just struggling to breathe.

    The doctor’s won’t give me a supply of the prednisol for more than a few days, so I am always out of it because whenever I go to the doctor I give him all the medicine over the few days’ worth of duration because he needs it. Is there anything else I can do like a home remedy to help him? Vick’s doesn’t seem to help him much and it just seems like maybe he is getting immuned to the breathing treatments or they just don’t help him enough anymore.

  277. Last year, I put down a plastic liner and covered it with bark chips to clean up the look of my garden and help prevent weed growth. Now it’s full of grass clippings and debris (leaves, old plant growth, etc.) from the past year. How do I clean it out? Do I just need to lay new bark over the top? How can I prevent having to do this again in the future?

  278. all of my neighbors have grass, I don’t. Its green, but it’s weeds I guess? I can’t afford a landscaper.

    what should I do to get pretty green healthy grass. And how long does it take to start growing.

    Also can i buy the roll down grass, like you see on tv.

  279. It’s 90 degrees here in NC today! My dear hubby recently decided to cover the lawn in weed killer & then fertilize it. His spreader was broken, so he did it by hand.
    Needless to say, my yard is brown.
    Am I wasting my time watering? It hasn’t rained in over a week & there is none in the forecast for the next 5 days or so.
    If I should water it, when? Does it do damage to water in the heat of day or is that an old wives tale?

  280. In my 90 gallon saltwater tank there is alot of algae growth it comes of in like long hair almost like seaweed but brown, how to I decrease this or get rid of it? Is there a special fish or something that eats it?

  281. Leaves die and fall off the trees before the winter. Its usually the windiest time during the fall. As I’m raking I thought maybe leaves serve as a blanket for the grass during the winter snow. Maybe we’re raking them too soon? Are there any nutrients in leaves benefiting the ground and grass? If left on the ground will they sufficate the grass? Anyone have any expert knowledge on this subject? :)

  282. Will putting a Preemergent under my mulch prevent or at least help control the growth of grass/weeds in my mulch?
    The beds were prepared last year with a week barrier, but not maintained too well. After I pick the grass out, can I smother out the remainder with a thick application of mulch?
    I meant weed barrier!

  283. I have quite bad hay fever and over the past day or two i have began to develop a sore throat, but only on the right side of my neck? if this is hay fever how to I stop it? and if it isn’t how long does a sore throat take to go?

  284. last year i planted an apple tree with 2 varieties ,when can i expect to see even a leaf/flower .
    Rather than how long ,it should read how many years.

  285. i have a horrible weed problem in my garden.. and i keep pulling them out by the roots yet they still come back.. and some weeds have taken control over my garden their roots are way to long and strong that i cant pull them out.. i tried digging yet they still dont go away.. somebody plz help me.. im totally againsted using any chemicals as i dont want to hurt the the other plants in my garden.
    anyone who knows suffin about gardening plz email me so we can talk my email address is fireloco4ever@yahoo.com

  286. After our brutal summer last year a lot of my scrubs just couldn’t take the heat and died. I’ve got a pretty big flower bed in the front yard that i’m planing on pulling up all the scrubs and redoing it. I’ve got a pretty big weed problem in the beds and i’m wondering what I should apply to them to prevent weed growth? I’m planning on adding some more soil and tilling it up , but i’m not sure what to add to help with the weeds.

  287. I need to do a search on this vegetation/weed/green growth that is growing on the ravine across the street from my house. I am interested b/c it is very tight, very soft, very green, and doesn’t seem to grow high at all. It looks like a putting green – so i am interested in cultivating this for my back yard. It is so low and tight it almost looks like fine moss but it has small leaves.

  288. I know weed isn’t physically addictive, but I’ve been reading up on it and found out for some people, it can become psychologically addictive.

    I’m 15 and I’ve been smoking weed casually for about a year but over the last month or so it’s been almost everyday. I’m not sweating for it or anything, but I do feel a bit lost if I don’t have any, like it’s become a bad habit.

    How long does it take to become addicted? I don’t want to get into that sort of lifestyle.

  289. Hi, so I just got a new air conditioner installed and I wanted to lay some rocks around the air conditioner and around the perimeter of the house to stop plants from growing there.

    I was thinking about digging about 5″ down into the soil, removing roots, etc around the places I want the rock and then laying cement/concrete into this dug out area. Once dried, I would fill it with those small white rocks. Would this work? Will it stop plants from growing into the area?

    Thanks!

  290. I want to build a deck on the back of the house. It will be about 30″ from the ground. I’ve thought about wooden piers and cinder block piers.
    In addition I have ideas about something beneath the deck to prevent weeds from growing there.

  291. …stop the weed growth?
    We use “weed kill” and bleach constantly. I think there should be a filler (Putty-like substance) that I could put there to stop the weeds once and for all. Help!!!

  292. I have sprayed so many weeds and over growth in the wooded areas around my house over the past two days. How long does it ‘really’ take to work?
    I’m in South Alabama. The high temps have been 89-95 degrees the last week and will continue for the rest of the week. It has also been bright & sunny since I started spraying.

  293. We have huge flower beds that need to be weeded, and none of us like doing it. And we are not willing to pay for someone else to come do it. Any tips on making it fun? Or easier?

  294. I’ve got two large dogs so its going to be impossible to grow new grass. I’m going to get creative with some mulch pathways. Should I put down plastic or newspaper first. From what I read its too keep out new grass. I don’t have that issue I just have dirt spots.

  295. I want to start a vegetable garden this year but the ground where I live consists entirely of clay. Because of this I’m building a raised garden. What kind of soil would be best in a raised veggie garden?
    (I’m located in the North East area; high weed growth problems. My garden is approximately 2x6ft.)

  296. I want to start a garden in the back but grass is already there. Do I just rototiller it with the grass & weeds. or remove grass and weeds than till or till with everything and is there something to buy and mix in to prevent future grass and weed growth? Help please

  297. In live near Indy. I managed to kill most of my English ivy by accident, so I have 20 feet x 2 feet of bare soil to work with.

    The ivy did a good job at preventing grass and weeds from popping up, but apparently English Ivy is an invasive species in Indiana. I suppose I should find something else. Plus it will take a few years for the few ivy vines to repopulate that large area.

    Are there any ground covers or plants that may fill this area and not require a bunch of mulch or weeding. Hostas are a possibility, but the dog tends to beat them up.

    Plox maybe? Flowers?

    I guess I need to find something thick enought and tall enough to prevent weed growth. Thanks.

  298. im covering backyard ground for weed control. Im doing it with newspapers, plastic, house carpet. I want to know if that is ok. Im trying to reduce cost.

  299. in my front yard i have alot of weeds. I want to grow grass, but i dont know the first thing to do to get rid of the weeds first, without pulling them out by the root. is there something i can buy that can kill the weed, but can help the grass…that wants to grow..? ha.

  300. One of the ‘bumps’ has green growth popping up through the surface, and the other looks like something wants to push up through any time now. Can I pour something like bleach into the open hole to kill the weed and then heat the bumps with a blowtorch and then tamper it back down flat? Would that be the best way to handle this problem or can someone offer some different advice?

  301. I know they sell rolls of stuff to put under mulch to prevent weed growth. Does circular sheets exist? I want to re-mulch about 45 trees along our driveway and want to put something down to prevent weed growth, but having to cut that many pieces out of the rolls seems wasteful. Does such a thing exist??

  302. Usually, I sweep sand into the cracks every so often, but this doesn’t prevent weeds and moss from reappearing. I can kill the offending stuff but scraping out the dead stuff is a time consumiing nightmare. What I’m looking for is something that will keep weed and moss growth to a minimum – if there is such a thing.

  303. surface. the plastic underneath has holes and the weeds grow thru. Is there a way to stop the weed growth other than spraying them with Roundup and pulling weeds almost every day?

  304. I have medium sized rocks (sort of like gravel) in my front lawn and weeds keep growing out of it. Is there anything I can do to stop the weeds from coming out. I have tried those weedkillers from local department stores but they only control the weeds that have already grown out. Is there anyway to make it so that the accumulated soil will not be able to have weeds.

    There is a layer of some sort of weed restricting material that is underneath when we first got the rocks. But it seems during these years some soil has accumulated between the rocks and that is where the weed is growing from. I have tried trowing bleach on it but it doesn’t seem to work

  305. Hi, i really want to stunt my growth because i get bullied at it for school. I’ve beeen drinking lot’s of caffeine, lifting weights above my head and i’ve been sleeping with three pillows so i don’t grow in my sleep. Now i want to know How many calories a day would I need to stunt my growth?

  306. I have 2 acres of rolling southern california land with moderate weed growth (not a lawn). I’ve seen riding mowers for a low as a grand–are they of acceptable quaility, power and durability? I’m not looking for anything fancy, just need to keep the weeds down with as little effort, money, and time as possible. Thx

  307. I have a lot of weeding to do in my lawn and I just don’t wNt to waste any time. I’m looking for tips to help me save time and energy. How much is needed to be removed of the weed to prevent re-growth? I have a lot of clover and dandylions so any tips on removing this would be especially helpful.

  308. I have a large hillside in my backyard and want to put something on it to prevent weed growth. A local landscaper told me to use “Round Star.” He said it’s a powder you spray on, then water to soak it in. But I have not been able to locate anything by that name. Any ideas?

  309. Is it true that weed stunts your growth? Does it only make you stop growing in height or do your breast stop growing too? What if your flat chested and haven’t really grown any breast yet, will they still grow after smoking weed?

    What about alcohol, like vodka, beer or wine, will that make you stop growing aswell?

  310. Hi, I am planning to de-weed many flower beds in yard and cover with weed cloth. What kinds of experiences have you had and do you have any suggestions for best brands and how well it works. I used it once 5 years ago for a smaller area, and found that many weeds grow right thru it.??? Also, would it be possible to just use fabric I have bought to sew on and don’t want any more ? Would this cause a problem ? Any landscapers/gardeners out there with some good insight ?

  311. I’m interested in gardening, but also don’t like to do more work than what is necessary, so I’m trying to make every step of the process of gardening easier for myself and I need to know what goes into it. This is what I know of currently:

    1. Turn the soil
    2. Sow seeds/put in seedlings that have been grown in the greenhouse
    3. Fertilize
    4. Irrigate
    5. Eliminate weeds
    6. Inspect growth and correct if necessary
    7. Prune branches and leaves, when necessary
    8. Harvesting

    - Did I miss something?

  312. Fence line? Around trees ? Along the house foundation ? Around AC unit? (For some reason, these trimmer line does not last very long nor work too good when trimming). If not for these area, where else can weed trimmer be used ? I have a riding mower and I do not need to mow open flat grass surface with a weed trimmer…. I was just wondering. Any tips on how I can better use my trimmer around fence lines and agains walls, etc, ?

  313. I have a huge weedy and dirt slopey hill in my backyard that gets a lot of sun and heat. Thankfully the fire dept. cut down the dead weeds, but I have no idea how to remove this large amount of low cut weeds or what to plant on this hill. I have a very low budget, so I was thinking about buying a couple of bags of bulk seeds and just spread them over the hill and try to water this hill as much as possible until I see some growth. Are there any such plant seeds that are drought tolerant and can overwhelm new weed growth? The hill is just too large to be watered on a regular basis. It’ll be a gardener’s dream, but I’m no gardener, I just want a decent looking backyard! Any Ideas?

  314. We live in a rural area and our driveway is gravel. We have had tons of rain in the past two months and the grass is taking over the gravel. We have tried every weed and growth killer on the market and it still pops back up. Any suggestions for killing the durn grass in the gravel?

  315. My pond has a terrible weed problem.Its like fine hair growing and it is a nightmare to get rid of. I have tried barley straw extract but it did not work. please help!!!

  316. Hello all,

    I reseeding my lawn last years and now (May) the lawn is green and beautiful. There are no weeds or death grass..all green. How do i keep up like this? I am from New York

    What steps i need do to prevent any damages or weeds growth.

    this is what my plan…

    1. i am going to fertilizer next week (May 14)
    2.. I will spray grub control in the end of July.

    Thanks in advance

  317. I bought a large container of Resolva weed killer but the spray nozzle doesn’t work. I followed the instructions and checked everything.

    This may seem a bit of an odd question but I don’t normally use chemicals, only a weedy patch is getting out of hand.
    I wouldn’t use a can that is for watering plants, I have an old spare one.

  318. “If a scientist wished to determine the effect of a certain herbicide on weed growth she would include a control in the investigation. Suggest a suitable control in this case.”

    All I know is a control is the procedure without the factor under investigation. I just have no idea what it actually means or where it fits into a experiment.

  319. The old patio’s cement is wearing out and it is too time consuming and expensive to replace it. Is there a low growth moss or other kind of filler I can use as a permanent fix? I live on Long Island if that helps with climate questions.

  320. I have no clue how to get rid of weeds. At first I used the manual tool to dig and take out weeds that takes too much time and the weeds come back up again. What am i supposed to do. Are there any products and or I will have to replace the entire grass.

  321. I have a dog and do not want to kennel him just so I have Weed and Feed my yard. Does anyone know of a harmless weed killer/fertilizer concoction to treat my yard. The clover and creeping charlie are starting to take over.

  322. Thinking about growing, pumpkins, watermelon, corn, etc. Looking for a way to irrigate that gives the plants what they need and doesnt waste. I believe we have well water supply. Also what would be the best way to block weed growth in the field and not hinder the growth of the crop. Finaly, any cheap eco/pet/human/vegitable natural insect control that could be used? thank you.

  323. I don’t want to pull the weeds and loosen up the bricks but since I have children and small pets I don’t want to use a harsh chemical weed killer, either. Is there some kind of household weed killer I can make that would be safer, or an all-natural product that would be effective?

  324. Is it true that weed stunts your growth? Does it only make you stop growing in height or do your breast stop growing too? What if your flat chested and haven’t really grown any breast yet, will they still grow after smoking weed?

    What about alcohol, like vodka, beer or wine, will that make you stop growing aswell?

  325. Hi,

    I live on 3/4 of an acre. For some reason, this Spring I am having a severe problem with weeds. I was wondering if any one knew of a good way to get rid of all the weeds. I was hoping for something that could be put on with a broadcast spreader and does not need to be watered in. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

  326. What I want to know is how and why.

    Like… will it stunt your growth in the sense that you don’t reach your optimum height, or will it just stunt it so that it takes longer for you to reach your max height?

  327. I spend hours hand weeding in my garden and my back hurts! Is there something out ther that works on all veges?? I’ve done mulching, tilling, and hoeing but the weeds keep coming. I’ve even tried preen but half of the veges didn’t come up. Is there some kind of a miracle weed control out there that I’ve missed or do I need to just keep taking the Advil for my back? Thanks

  328. I often have bought expensive weed killers to take out weeds, and small tree’s growth. But someone told me recently that bleach could be used and it would be just as effective,
    Does anyone know if that is true.

  329. I think fall is better but is it bad to aerate in the spring? I’ve heard that it promotes weed growth.
    I know location matters and I am in Ontario, Canada

  330. This year seems to have doubled the weed growth. I’ve tried every kind of weed kill, but nothing is working. The roots are deep making it a chore to hoe ‘em down. Someone told me white vinegar and soap, others say salt Anyone have a sure and inexpensive way of getting rid of the weeds?

  331. I’m trying to figure out the correct ratio of 24D to water in a one gallon sprayer to eliminate weed growth in a gravel driveway. I know that I’ll probably have to apply several times. I’ve tried to trim the weeds back to kill them out but they keep coming back.

  332. I am doing a science fair project on how the type of mulch affects plant growth. What topics should I research, other than mulch? I don’t know very much about plants, so I don’t know what about plants I should research. Please help.

  333. I have a lot of weeds that I would like to cover with a plant that overcomes weeds, with sheer growth and coverage.
    Any ideas?
    Great help.
    Any prolific plants with some colour?
    Great help.
    Any prolific plants with some colour?

  334. In the spring and summer, the grass in my front yard doesn’t look nice at all. When the grass grows, it is thin and often there are patches of dirt with no grass.
    My questions are: When should I start growing more grass? What kind of grass seeds do I use? How do I prepare the ground? What month would I start to plant the grass in Michigan?
    Any other information would be great too! Thanks!

  335. If I was to dig up some grass from one place in our yard and transplant it somewhere else, what would you guess the outcome would be? I am going to dig up an area for a garden. There is a sloped area that used to get washed out, so there’s no grass there. I fixed the “washing out” issue. Is is possible to move the grass there or is it just a waste of time? Any special measures I should take?

  336. Apparantly the home builder that I bought my house from did not put down some kind of weed or grass guard underneath the soil where my flowers and hedges are. Now grass is completelly taking over the bed. It looks terrible, I pull it often but it grows so fast I cant keep up with it. I heard using a grass/weed killer in your flower bed will kill your shrubs, hedges, and flowers too. Is there any help for me?

  337. I have a patch of grass that will not grow. Neighbor who is in the know about lawns says the spot is peat moss, but doesn’t know how to grow grass over it.

  338. 2 weeks ago, my yard was seeded with grass and fertilizer. How long will it take the grass to grow in full? I see patches of grass but not really any consistant growth pattern. I have been watering everyday but am thinking maybe I should get more seed to lay down.

  339. I have 3 small dogs (Maltese female, Shih Tzu female, Yorkie male) and my backyard is just concrete. There’s no dirt or grass or anything, so I wanted to create a small grass area where they can go potty or just chill on the grass.

    I’m planning to make it about 7′x4′ of grass. (I will be laying out some plywood on top of the concrete and then add the grass on top of that).

    What kind of grass would be good to use, and that maybe doesn’t need too much maintenance? mowing it is ok I don’t mind doing that, but I won’t be able to water it all every day since the water hose is in the front of the house, so I’ll have to get some extensions and put them on and off every time.

    Any other ideas? Or maybe a different type of wood to use? I’m using wood because I saw on the tv that when putting grass on concrete it’s a good idea to place wood under the grass so it absorbs the water but the grass roots can still “drink” from it, because if the concrete absorbs it then it’s gone. So I’m not sure how accurate that is?

  340. YARD grass, not *that* grass. How do I get seeds from my yard to grow the first plant? And what is a good way to grow it inside? How tall should I cut it?
    Wow, I thought everyone would know what *that* grass was. Just ’cause you asked, I will speak the unspeakable. Marijuana is *that* grass.

  341. I have crab grass and other nasty weeds growing throughout my lawn and in my flower beds, is there anything I can use to treat both the weeds and crab grass that wont harm the lawn or flowers?

    Is there something specific to use in flower beds?

  342. My backyard is filled with weeds and little plants but there is NO Grass. My dad is using a pick and digging up the whole backyard. After he removes all the weeds, if we put new soil(new one from the bag, i think its called lawn fertilizer) and then put the seeds, will the grass grow?

  343. I have two huge oak trees in my yard. Grass won’t grow under them. I see other trees, similar, and grass is growing under them. I know light is an issue, but I am thinking maybe the area under the trees stays too dry. Should I be watering?

  344. In Chicago, my friend’s yard has weak grass in the side yard (partly sunny) and almost no grass in the back yard, always shaded by a big old tree that he will not cut down. He said he has put down 60 pounds of grass seed.

  345. I just bought a house that has lots of tree’s in the front yard but no grass. I would like any suggestions on what type of grass I should plant in a shaded area and do I need to wait for spring or can I plant grass seeds now?
    I live in Texas and it is just beginning to not hit 100 everyday.
    Thank you for any suggestions.

  346. I am wondering how to distinguish “quality” grass seed from grass seed sold at big box stores. I live in Colorado Springs (Zone 5-6) and I am looking to conserve water so it would have to also be drought tolerant. Are there particular brands that are better than others? Is so, which ones?

  347. Our grass was looking really good earlier this spring but our sprinkler system had a malfunction and we had to wait a week before we could get it fixed. We were out of town for that week so we couldn’t get it watered with the hose and reg. sprinkler head. The temperatures were in the 80s with little rain (we live in CO.) Now our grass is yellow and unhealthy looking. We’ve been trying to revive it but we’re off on the watering cycle and can’t seem to get it to look green again. Any advice on what we can do? How long should our watering cylcles be and when is the best time to water?

  348. i want to put grass into my courtyard. to do that, we wanted to knock out the tiles, but we arnt sure how much concrete there is under there! is it possible to put some soil straight onto the paving stones and then put the grass straight on top?

    also, is it possible to knock the tiles out ourselves?

  349. Ok I recently planted Bermuda grass through out my centipede and weed lawn.I had allot of bare spots in my yard now filled with bermuda grass.I want to favor the Bermuda with the food and water to get it to take over the centipede.My question is what type of fertilizer to use (10-10-10 or whatever)and how ofter to feed it?

  350. My previous dog wore down the grass in my back yard along the fence line where she would pace the yard back and forth.

    The grass is completely gone and the dirt is compacted hard. We’ve given the dog away to a better home and need to repair the grass.

    Without having to buy a tiller to loosen the soil, is there another way to fix the problem? The path is about 18-24″ wide and probably 120′ feet long.

  351. I’m planting grass on elevated terrace, with concrete flooring. I’m browsing a lot of sites saying that the grassroots will damage the concrete in time, and thinking of putting something before the garden soil. What’s the best protector on my flooring?

  352. I have beach grass in my yard that I am researching, but I can’t find any sources. It dies over the winter, but now little green blades are shooting up through it like there’s nothing dead there. Can anyone give me any sites or straight info on beach grass?

  353. I am trying to grow grass, it’s very hot out there and birds keep eating the seeds.
    I put a thin plastic wrap over the ground to protect the seeds from birds and to avoid water to evaporate. Is that a good idea?
    Any other suggestions?

  354. I need a good grass type pokemon to beat the eighth gym (Dragon type) in Johto, mainly to beat leader Clair’s Gyrados. Any good grass or electric type pokemon reccomendations that you can get up to this point in the game would be very much appreciated.

    PS: I have a Hoppip, is it good enough?

  355. I tried the cat grass treat from Target and she loved it, but the grass died quickly. I’d like to plant something in a pot that she can eat, but i’m not sure what to plant. Thanks!

  356. I want to get rid of some of the grass in my yard and start a garden there. I was gonna just start digging up the grass and throwing the dirt that’s underneath the grass on top of the grass that I just dug up. But if I do that, will the grass just eventually keep growing underneath the soil on top until it comes back up thru my garden? Do I have to buy new topsoil and to put on the new garden space? Do I have to dig up all the grass on top and actually throw all that dug up grass away? Or can I just bury that dug up grass underneath the soil?

  357. The weeds are a nuisance as they overtake the carpet grass and spoil the lawn. Some weed-killer kill all both the weeds and the carpet grass. Is there any chemical that can save the grass but get rid of the weeds?

  358. My grass hardly grows. My whole property is basically clay. Some one told me to spread lime on my grass to help change the ph. This is fairly common on clay. Is this true? if it is, is there a specific type of lime I should be buying?

  359. I just planted some Bermuda grass seeds a couple of days ago. Assuming I’ve done everything right so far, how long will it take for me to see any grass sprout? And how long will it take for the grass to actually thicken up and look nice?

  360. During the summer, my grass really dries out and is rough and yellow-green. (it is sort of a competition between our neighbors) I want to get my grass to be looking its best, how do i go about doing that? A good routine?

  361. I have planted grass in this one area several times over the past three years and I have had no success. It is a low lying area so when it rains it sits. It is a VERY high traffic area right outside the office door. In the summer time the old tree covers the area and lets little sunlight in. I don’t care what kind of grass it is I just want it covered. Crab grass, clover whatever works….
    I live on the Eastern Shore of Maryland where we see drought and periods of heavy rain.

  362. My back yard has Buffalo grass rather than St Augustine. It is a large yard and the buffalo grass is hardier in the heat of Central Texas.

  363. We are just about to plant grass for a new rugby field and I was wondering a certain type of grass would be better to plant than say regular Kentucky blue grass. The field is located in central Illinois on the plains, usually with good rain year round (less in the summer of course). The follow up question would be is it too late to plant this fall (last week of October)?

  364. I just want to grow some grass in my little garden (in the UK) and not have to cut it as I don’t have a lawn mower and don’t want to buy one, as I don’t have the space to store it and it’s costly.

  365. I have two trees in my front yard. The grass under one of them only gets the very early morning sun, so the grass is very patchy. What would be the best grass to plant there?

  366. I have limestone rocks around the perimeter of my home and I have grass growing in between the rocks and it hard for me to cut the grass that close to the rocks. I don’t always want to use a string trimmer either. Without killing the grass behind the grass closest to the rocks how do I accomplish this?

  367. My yard has quite a few brown dead grass spots from where I take my dog out to pee. Is there a way to fix the dead grass or do I need to completely start over with the spots and put grass seed there? I have started trying to take my dog to different spots so she’s not going pee in the same areas but still want to fix the areas that are already damaged. Any suggestions is appreciated.

  368. What would be a good kind of low-maintenance grass?
    My cottage is in Ontario, and the specific area where the grass would go is fairly dry and shady, and I would not be able to consistently water it.
    Also, what is an easy way to plant it?

  369. We replaced all the grass in the front yard with new grass last 2 day. We put fertilizer and water it.

    but the grass start to turn brown and the soil is dry. It is not enough water?

    And how do I water new grass?

    I live in South Texas, very hot in afternoon and cool in morning.
    I just water it, lot of water. But the root don’t seem to get very wet. Do I need to water more?

    And how frequently do i need to water my grass?

  370. I don’t really care about my backyard’s grass but it’s really green and lush…my front yard however is the one I care more about and the grass is dying and I need to revive it before April 24….

    It is possible that I can switch the grass around? Would it be faster than trying to revive it? Will it stay green once the front yard is replaced?

  371. our backyard grass doesn’t look good, with several types of weeds and other taller plants growing out of it. we want to put in new grass, would putting seeds or rolling out those grass rolls be best? i have no experience with these types of yardwork, just want to help the folks do theirs. any helpful advice is appreciated.

  372. I Live in S. Florida and I need to grow grass for the home owners assoc. I would like to grow the grass myself and not purchase sod. Is it possible. Thanks

  373. Hello, my name is Alison. I did some research about grass that is good for shady area. I stumbled upun ” Mondo/Monkey Grass ” and I was wondering in which stores are they sold at? I live in in the GTA (Greater Toronto Area). I’m only 13 and no one in my family is interested in landscaping the backyard. It’s a total disaster. Also, what type of soil do I need? thanks!
    If it is only located in the US what type of grass is good for shady toronto area?

  374. My front lawn is growing very thick grass, and its coving the rest of my good grass. I have thought about spraying Round Up on the thick wee grass, killing them, them shovel them off and then plant grass seed. The grass is growing back, but once again covered with weed grass. So is there something out there that kill the thick weed grass, but keeping the normal grass at the same time ? Much appreciated !

  375. I HAVE A ABOVE GROUND POOL THAT WAS DROPPED ABOUT 2 FEET IN THE GROUND. THE HOLE IS 18 FEET ROUND AND THE POOL IS 16. CAN I FILL AROUND THE OUTSIDE WITH SAND? IT’S A INTEX POOL. NOT THE BLOW UP KIND.

  376. My 5 y.o. Great Dane / Mastiff hound continually pics up TICS from out of his yard. His yard has lost all the (soft) grass and has continued, if not advanced the spread of ragweeds. These weeds do grow in bunches and stay low to the ground.
    In aim to try controlling the TIC infestation, I am planning to cut (actually SHAVE w. my weed whacker) all these weed-growths.
    The soil underneath is primarily only a caliche-blend, so I am not sure how, if anything besides more weeds will grow there. – Am I right to expect the bare ground to absorb the summertime heat thereby not providing any cool spots for my dane to lie or should I leave the weed-growth and plan to continue spot-treating him w. paramite chemicals?
    I have used Bug killer chemicals on his yard only with limited results.
    We are in the Texas pahandle (planting zone 6) of the USA.

  377. A product that is good fo your overall hair health, you know gives strength and manageabilty. And helps grow your hair like a weed.
    Please include:
    1. The product
    2. Where to get it
    3. How long it takes to work ( ex. it grew my hair 2 inches in a month)
    Thanks!

  378. I have a rectangular area of grass in my front yard that is about 15 feet by 4 feet. I’m planning to remove a small rectangular portion of it, about 2 feet (of the 15 feet) by 4 feet so I can either plant some small bushes (or other). The main purpose to stop neighborhood dogs from doing their business on the area, and the second purpose is to make it look prettier. A lot of the grass is already yellowed/burned from dog urine (and it’s not my dog’s), so I’m wondering if I can just use a shovel to start digging and removing the grass. It seems like too much effort to rent a tiller to remove such a small area of grass, or to do the lasagna method. Any cons to just shoveling?

  379. I thought they were bad last year. This year, its easily been at least 3 times as many as last year and last year I must have had 30.

    Ive got the grass looking fairly well from weeds but these Mushrooms are out of control.

    What can I put down so that they stop. Hopefully one time lasts many years.

    Just plain white mushrooms that can grow to 2 inches from a good rain overnight it seems.

    Its a small front yard. Might take him 10 minutes to cut just the front grass.
    Bham, AL area. Regular grass, nothing special.

  380. My friend is thinking about getting high off weed with her other friend and I’m trying to get her to understand that it’s bad and not to do it in a way that she’ll understand. What exactly could end up happening to her so I can tell her?

  381. I have a 15′x20′ garden in the Colorado mountains. We accumulated a good number of weeds this year. Neither my wife or I had time to pull them this summer. My wife tells me we can simply allow them to die with any remaining plants, pull and dead growth (weeds and plants) next spring, then replant. My concern is not pulling up the weeds before winter might cause more weeds in the next growing season. So, should I weed the garden now (fall), wait until spring, or does it not make a difference?

  382. I just got sod installed at the beginning of October. I live in Denver, CO, so we have already had a few frozen nights, but I think I can continue to water for another week or so before the sprinkler system freezes.

    Would the grass be fine for spring if I were to stop watering this weekend and lay down some winterizer? I was thinking a weed and feed, but will just do fertilizer if that might be too much for the sod.

    Is there anything else I should do to let the new sod go dormant so that it’ll be ready to go in the spring? Thanks!

  383. I’ve got a few garden beds that I don’t want to rip out, but only get maintenance once every eight weeks, so they invariably get overrun.

    Any suggestions for useful ground cover or even flowers that won’t get out of hand and turn into a jungle?

    A weed mat isn’t an option as the blonde bloke in my photo will have it shredded in less than twelve hours.

    I’m in Melbourne, so it’s a temperate summer climate at the moment.

    Thanks.

  384. It looks bad having all those weeds and grass coming up between the sidewalk blocks. I have heard about using bleach or salt or dish soap. I don’t want to hurt the grass on the lawn, though.

    Doesn’t anyone have any suggestions?

  385. I noticed that certian types of grass smell really good when cut like Floratam St. Augustine. There is a type of cool season grass that smells really bad when cut it makes me nauseous. What causes the diffrences in smell?

  386. My front yard is centerpede grass which has not been cared for a long time. The grass is thinning, and many spots dying. Right now it is very dried and brown (as it should be because it’s just early spring). My question is how to restore this grass? I want to buy centerpede grass seed and and re-seed the lawn but how do I do it? Just spray the seed over the old grass or do I have to till and rake the lawn up before apply the grass seed? Thank for your help.

  387. I have a lot of weeds on my three lot house. About 10% is covered in dandilines but other things like crabgrass, etc. exist. I need to know how I can stop this infestation. Doing everything by hand or buying a commercial fertilizer works. I need a treatment that will get rid of all of them in a reasonable time and not kill my grass at the same time. I am open to mixing up a homemade fertilizer since the cheapest option is the best to a college student like me. Thank you.

  388. Our grass grows at a snails pace, and personaly I like long grass. I want to garden, but unfortunatly my mom insists on paying a gardener 20 bucks to mow our lawn every other week. Frankly the grass looks absolutely the same. Since the gardener has to mow the lawn every other week, I’m not allowed to plant ANYTHING in our garden, because it gets in the way. I’m a dreaming botanist, but everytime I confront my mom about the lawn she yells at me that it’s neccasary. I even offer to do all the work she gets mad anyways. Meanwhile I have super slow internet while my mom pays the gardener to mow nothing.

  389. How can I get grass to stop growing in my vegetable garden? We paid to have somebody rototill it but obviously they did not do a good job I guess. The vegetables are coming up well, but there is a lot of grass coming up too. How can I kill all the grass without killing the veggies and melons? If it matters there are peas, garden beans, wax beans, cantaloupe, green mellon, watermelon, crenshaw melon, cucumbers, summer squash, zucchini, peppers, hungarian hot peppers, jalapeno peppers and habenero peppers in there. I know one obvious way would be to pick out all the grass by hand, but that seems like a ton of work. I am wondering if there is an easier way?

  390. The lady we bought our house from had what she called a “wildflower garden” in the front yard. Actually, I mostly saw weeds there last year.

    We have bought mulch (wood chips) for the front yard, to spread out and help stop the growth of dandilions and other weeds.

    How deep do we have to spread the mulch to do any good?

  391. I have a problem with weeds in my garden and have tried killing them with weed killer but they always return. I have spent the weekend digging up the weeds and stones and i have now covered it with weedblock premium control fabric to try to stop the weeds. I want to know if i can now put new soil on top of the weed block fabric and then lay new grass on top of the soil.
    I`m new to gardening so not sure if this is ok to go ahead with or am i heading for trouble.
    Any advice would be great i`m despreate.

  392. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  393. Hello. My backyard is half concrete patio and half dirt. Along the perimeter of the dirt part (along the fence) is a continuous type of area enclosed by the bricks that surrounds most of the backyard. Basically, I want to cover this entire area and lay wood-chips down on top. Problem is, I’ve laid weed blocker down around this area, but it did not seem to fully stop grass and weeds from growing. I was wondering if it would be helpful to first cover the area with an inch layer of sand AND THEN cover with weedblocker and finally put wood-chips on top of that. Thanks in advance.

  394. My neighbour has spayed weedkiller on some weeds on his garden, some of the weedkiller has blown across to my garden and some of the leaves on a few of my plants have died. My plants are all edible plants – berries, vegetables etc. I’ve no way of knowing how much of the weedkiller has blown across into my garden. My question is – are the plants safe to eat?

    Unfortunately he’s on holiday for a few weeks so can’t ask him exactly what he used, but I think he bought recently from B&Q if that helps i.e. I assume it’s not some banned substance from the 1960s.

  395. I moved into my house which I am renting in January. The previous people did not take care of the yard so I have a lot of work to do. I am responsible for the yard.
    About a week ago I put down Weed Stop by Vigoro in my front yard as 80% of the front yard is weeds. The grass is St. Augustine and I live in the Dallas Fort Worth area. It gets very hot here in the summer.
    I was told to put Weed and Feed down 2 weeks after the Weed Stop.
    Does the Weed Stop work?
    Also, I also want to treat my back yard but I don’t want to use anything that will harm my dogs. It will be very difficult to take them to the front yard for a couple days, but will if necessary. I would rather find something else that will work to stop the growth of weeds and still be safe for pets.

    My backyard looks better than the front but there is still weeds.

    Also, if there are any other suggestions on how to get my yard green and thick..I would appreciate them.

  396. We have an area between our deck and house that is “useless” and grows over every year with weeds. Today, my husband took some fine gravel, weed-eated the weeds right down to the dirt, and put about 1.5 to 2 inches over-top. Are we going to regret not putting down a landscaping cloth to stop the grass/weeds from growing? Or will the stones stop the growth? I don’t plan on planting anything in this particular spot, just some interesting bigger rocks that the kids have collected from our adventures.
    I know I can use mulch, but the gravel was free… therefore, I am wondering if I will regret not putting down a barrier in between…. aka should I rake it all out and put down landscaping cloth or newspapers, OR will the 2 inches of gravel be enough. I am talking about fine gravel… about the size of fish tank gravel.

  397. so about 2 years ago i started smoking like everyday and since then i havent been the same. im more socially awkward, think too much about things and think i have an emotional maturity stunt growth. can heavy use of marijuana cause these things?

  398. I strted smoking weed about three months ago and did it for a lot and i havent done it about a month and a half but during that time i have grown a couple of inches (im only 15) but my ***** have not showed any growth and i have a 4inch ***** so can weed and legal weed stop the growth of my *****.

  399. I have this really thick bladed grass taking over my yard or so it seems. This buddy of mine calls it water grass. Is there any way of getting rid of it without hurting my existing grass?

  400. We had some bad weather recently and it blew pine needles from the woods behind my house into my back yard. I typically just cut my grass & the mower mulches so I don’t have to worry about bagging.

    My question is will the pine needles cause more weeds than if I bagged the clippings ?

    Thanks

  401. hey, im 15 years old and i have done weed about 5 times, yeah i know its bad for you and all the other stuff it does to your mind, but does it stunt your growth? im 5foot11, but want to make it to about 6.0, maybe 6,1!! and i want to know if i do it…..lets say once a month and only one or two joints, it will properly stunt my growth?

    Thanks in advance

  402. Is pasture grass for horses an anual plant or a perenial plant?
    Does it need to be replanted every year?
    OK:) A little more info. . .I have 5 acres total. I plan to build a home this spring. I live in Central Illinois, and the land I am fencing in is a little low for the area. I volunteer at a horse rescue farm. I will not be bringing any horses home this year. . .but I might be ready next year. I wanted to give the grass time to establish itself, and I am also waiting until I actually live on the land before I buy a horse. 2 horses max, 2 acres divided into 3 lots to rotate.. . . low land that was planted in corn last year. You folks that have tried to help have been terrific, and I appreciate it very much.

  403. Im 5’5 and im 16. My dad is 5’10 and my mom is 5’4 . I smoke weed like everyday but so do my friends and they are all taller than me. I dont know if imma slow grower or what . I just wnna know with NOO BIASED ANSWERS

  404. Well i’v been smoking since i was about 13 im 15 now and i was jus wondering does marijuana cause your growth to stunt because my wrist are smaller than average and there unlikely as well jus some things im catchin up on thanks, jus want that right person 2 give me the right answer.
    I jus look so much younger than my age i jus wanna know. i think i should

  405. and it killed my lawn, i use it at the recomended setting for my spredder, anyways, my lawn has grew back abou 90-95% after a few months, and i want to kill the weeeds again, any other solution i can use, i have st augustine grass and dont want to burn my lawn with the vigoro weed and feed

  406. I dug up a huge part of my yard to plant gardens. I plant things as I can but the weeds are uncontrollable. I am pulling them all of the time. Should I use weed killer? If I do when could I plant new plants? I already put down a thick layer of newspaper and mulch. I was hoping that flowers would take over so I didn’t have as many weeds to pull.

  407. My husband wanted to find a way to stop the grass from growing in our garden, since we will leave the house for a year because we’ll be going abroad and we have no caretaker to maintain our garden. He fears that since we cannot hire a caretaker or gardener (because we cannot pay the gardener monthly, since we will be away. We also fear that if we give the gardener advance payment, we wouldn’t be there to supervise the job), grasses in the garden would not be regularly cut. No one will live in the house for a year. Relatives are too busy to oversee it, and we don’t have available neighbors to maintain it too. Would you have an alternative idea how to keep or stop the grass from growing while we’re away?

  408. does the roll up thing from the cigar,the leaf and paper contain chemicals similar to tabaco?
    i dont want to consume any tabaco.im still young and have years to grow,i dont wnat to mess up my growth

  409. I usually don’t smoke that much (like maybe at a party or with some friends once a month), but I realized that it really helps me sleep. I take melatonin, which is an all natural sleeping medicine, but probably once a week or so, that doesn’t do the trick and i can’t sleep the whole night, so I started smoking to help that. So does smoking 1-2 times a week effect muscle growth because I am trying to get bigger for basketball.

  410. In a northern wisconsin lake in early summer, does anyone know about how deep down the sun would reach? I am going fishing up there with no electronics and I want to try to make an educated guess of about where the weed edges would be. The lake is a pretty clear lake.
    in fishing we call em weeds

  411. This saturday i was presured into taking two hit off a bong the only changes i noticed was my pupils became big and i became happy.will this stunt my growth im only 14 and about 5 5.The next day i felt normal and my pupils got smaller but not back to normal.Should i be worried and are your pupils suposed to do that.

  412. All plants have seeds. Where are the seeds from grass? You can buy grass seeds, but where do they get them from? I don’t think I’ve ever seen a grass seed. (lol)

  413. i lift weights around 3 times a week. if i smoke a little on the weekends, will it make it harder for my body to build muscle/get stronger?

    please no anti-weed propaganda, i want a legit scientific answer.

  414. What is best to use on large weeds that have taken over a back garden like a jungle.
    They are very thick and I want to kill them off (there is no grass underneath..no sun gets to the ground)
    I had a go with roundup ages ago but it didn’t seem to do anything…any ideas????

  415. I live in So CA and it is HOT!! I don’t have a sprinkler system in my backyard, which means that I have to water it with a hose and move it around the backyard, just to keep my sad grass barely alive.
    I am thinking of giving up on grass, such a waste of water and time, does anyone have any ideas on what to do to your backyard if you don’t want grass? Woodchips or anything???

  416. ok im 15 and have been smoking for 5 months but only once everymonth than i realized it was a mistake and quit ive only smoked a little but compared to people i know that smoke everyday so will there be any long term effects on me even though ive only smoked once a month for 5 months ive quit for 2 and a half months and i dont plan to go back on weed so what long term effects does it have and does it stunt growth in any way?

  417. I live in Sacramento. My backyard has weeds that grow at extremely fast rates (in 2 months, a completely flattened area can be knee high with weeds.

    I want to turn my backyard jungle into a respectable lawn. I know that I have to free up the soil so that when I lay down my sod, it will grow better. How do I prepare the soil to prevent weeds from growing back quickly but at the same time, allowing my new sod to grow freely?

    Also, are there any techniques you can give me on:

    1. drainage;
    2. attaching a sprinkling system
    3. types of sods that provide nice looking green grass that is durable (with sprinkling) in very hot summers.

    Thanks in advance for any assistance. I have a major project ahead of me and I am not an experienced gardener/landscaper.

  418. I mean i know its a class b drug now, and that it isn’t exactly good for you, but tobacco seems just as bad if not worse. What makes weed class B and tobacco legal?
    (Btw i know about the long terms effects of weed, but that only happens to one in ten users)

  419. I mean, I know it cannot simply be the look of the plant as there are some pretty weeds out there as well. So what is the botanist answer of the difference between the two?

  420. It takes agees to scrub and i just need a quick fix either natural or household, our pond has a lino and it is a fish pond so cant use anything unfish freindly ;) please dont say grass carp as this would take too long :)

  421. Okay well im 16 , about 5’4 , i have somewhat armpit hair and pubic hair and my ***** is 6 inches erect , can i still grow even though i smoked marijuana before?

  422. Hello I have a twin brother and I was always taller than him and stronger when I was 11 I started smoking cigarettes with my friends and then smoked weed i stopped for a few months then started heavily smoking weed and ciggarretes then only started smoking cigarettes occaionaly and im 14 now and smoke weed everyday and a few drags of ciggarretes every few days and my twin is now much taller and stronger

  423. well i’m and Ive done weed a couple times.. yea yea don’t judge aha but my dad caught me in November 2008 then i stopped and i only did it once till this day. but he said it lowers your ************ level and muscle growth?? i’m not sure if he was trying to scare me or what.. AND my short-term memory sucks @ss

  424. I’ve been hearing a lot lately about a product called Grass-B-Gone. This product claims to kill only bermuda grass and I was wondering if anyone has tried it. I’m not a lazy gardener and I’m in my garden every day pulling bermuda grass and quite frankly I hate it. Every year I pull grass. I hate this grass, I hate it, do you hear me? It just keeps coming. Anyhow, I’ve done some research about Grass-B-Gone and it looks promising. What do ya’ll think?

  425. I love grass and I want to eat it

    What species of grass are edible

    What happens if I eat the grass in my backyard?
    actually i pretend to be a horse not a goat

    if i wanted to be a goat i would eat soda cans

  426. I want to redo my yard with colored grass but i’m having trouble finding where to get it. I found a website that sells artificial grass but i’d like real grass not fake. is all colored grass fake? where can i get colored grass? thank you in advance